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A List of Genre Fiction by Self-Identifying Females

For the benefit of myself and others

· art,Books,Women

Recently, I posted on facebook a list entitled “What's On My Bookshelf: Winter 2016,” which read as follows:

- The Complete Cthulu Mythos Tales by HP Lovecraft
- Jerusalem by Alan Moore
- Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by John Tiffany
- Odalisque by Neal Stephenson
- The Cambridge Introduction to Modern British Theatre
- Great Short Stories of Joseph Conrad
- Alphonse Mucha “Slovanska Epopej” (Slav Epic) museum booklet.
- Hadji Murat by Leo Tolstoy
- Man Plus by Frederick Pohl
- Hellstrom’s Hive by Frank Herbert
- Sundiata: An Epic of Old Mali
- A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
- World War Hulk by Greg Pak and others

To which a female friend commented:

Somewhat irked, I asked for further recommendations of speculative or historical fiction by female identifying writers. These are the recommendations I got, some with supplied summaries.

Recommended by Elise Wien:

- Especially Heinous: 272 Views of Law & Order SVU by Maria Machado: "Almost sci-fi but not quite, Maria Machado's novella plays out over 272 'episodes' of SVU. For Benson and Stabler, identities swap, relationships crumble, and the special victims return to haunt them."

- The Vegetarian by Han Kang: "Translated from Korean, this is the tale of a woman who decides to become a vegetarian, and her marriage, relationship with her family, and connection to the outside world deteriorates as she turns toward a live of asceticism. Its use of language is quiet and cinematic."

- Song of the Water Saints by Nelly Rosario: "This book follows generations of Dominican women, stemming from colonial rule to U.S. immigration. Rosario uses sensuous language and transnational themes to construct a narrative that edges on mystical."

Also Recommended by Elise Wien:

- Through the Arc of the Rain Forest by Karen Tei Yamashita
- Tropic of Orange by Karen Tei Yamashita
- I Hotel by Karen Tei Yamashita
- Midnight Robber by Nalo Hopkinson
- The Salt Roads by Nalo Hopkinson
- Swing Time by Zadie Smith
- Fingersmith by Sarah Waters

Recommended by Susan Shay:

- Katherine of Aragon by Alison Weir

- The Outlander Series by Diana Gibaldoon

- The White Princes/Queen by Phillippa Gregory

- The Tudor Series by Phillippa Gregory

- The Red Tent by Anita Diamant

- Boston Girl by Anita Diamant

- Girls with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier

- The Lady and the Unicorn by Tracy Chevalier

Recommended by Sam Tillis:

- Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin: "A world without gender comes to terms with a man who claims to be an ambassador from the stars."

- Book of the Unnamed Midwife by Meg Elison: "Bleak post-apocalyptic fiction with a decidedly feminist viewpoint: In a world destroyed by disease, ravaged now by gangs of murderers and rapists, who delivers the babies?"

Recommended by Genya Peregudov:

- July's People by Nadine Gordimer: “Its an alternate reality to the end of apartheid or lack thereof which led to a revolution by the blacks, specifically looking at the ability/inability of an upper class white family adapting to life with the tribe of their servant (whom they treated well) after fleeing the revolution.”

Recommended by Jeremy Cole:

- The King's Persons by Joanne Greenberg: “A harrowing fictional re-telling of the York Massacre of 1190, when that English town purged its Jewish population.”

- Daughter of Fortune by Isabel Allende: “Daughter of Fortune interweaves fact and fiction in this look at Gold Rush San Francisco through the eyes of a female immigrant from Chile.”

- Bel Canto by Ann Patchett: "Very loosely based on a 1996 hostage crisis in Lima, Peru, Bel Canto tells the story of a disparate group of people thrown together when militants storm a politician's home during a social event."

Have you read any of these or have further recommendations? Please let me know!

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